UNEP Food Waste Index Report 2021: a brief analysis

When I first saw the headline from the UNEP report that 931 million tonnes of food is wasted a year, I was happy! In 2011, an FAO report said it was 1.3 BILLION tonnes. But then I read closer – it was because the UNEP report did not include farm-level food waste, and the FAOContinue reading “UNEP Food Waste Index Report 2021: a brief analysis”

Holes and goals: The UK’s curious food waste targets

Do we have the right food waste targets? Why does it matter? In my previous blog ‘What is food waste?’ I explored how food waste is defined, who comes up with the definitions, and what impact this could have on policy. Since then, I have read Feedback’s (strangely named) report “When there’s no waste, there’sContinue reading “Holes and goals: The UK’s curious food waste targets”

Food waste as art: Part 2

Can food waste be beautiful? This question was posed by a Your Story contributor and inspired the first blog on ‘Food waste as art’ back in September, where I explored how artists have captured the morbidly fascinating process of decay. It turns out that creating art from food waste is not a rare phenomenon, andContinue reading “Food waste as art: Part 2”

What gives food more value, and how does this reduce food waste?

“… what remains when the good, fruitful, valuable, nourishing and useful has been taken […] the tat, the lowly that has sunk to the depth of a value system”. Scanlan, 2005 As Scalan posits, and as I explore in the Longer read What is food waste?, waste is simply something that has lost value toContinue reading “What gives food more value, and how does this reduce food waste?”

National Geographic: The End of Trash

By Robert Kunzig and Luca Locatelli I was so delighted when the National Geographic devoted its March 2020 issue to waste, including its front page spread and mesmerising images from Luca Locatelli. I actually found out about it from following Locatelli on Instagram, and immediately ran out to the newsagent to buy a copy. FoodContinue reading “National Geographic: The End of Trash”